Colorado Local Business, Insurance, and Government Resources

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Business Resources - Anything from getting a business license to finding funding

Local Insurance directory - Find local insurance brokers, agents, or companies

Government Contacts - Get in contact with each level of local government

Colorado Local Business Resources

There are several local, state, and federal requirements that new business owners must comply with when choosing Colorado as the location for their business. It is important to be aware of what these requirements are to ensure a seamless business registration process.

To register a new business, you can head to the Colorado Secretary of State office or fill up the form online. You must also decide on a trade name and register that with the SOS office in Colorado. If applicable, you need to contact the US Patent and Trademark Office when registering your business name or that of your business entity.

Obtain your business credit and your federal tax identification number through the IRS. The Colorado Department of Revenue will be the one to distribute the withholding account number. Make sure that the following forms (whatever is applicable to your business) are completely filled out:

· Federal/state unemployment

· State withholding

· Worker's compensation

· State and local sales tax

It is also recommended that you check for local regulatory environment permits. If not, then you have nothing to worry about. If yes, you must obtain additional licenses and permits for zoning. The type of insurance required of your business will also be determined by the nature of business.

Local Insurance Info, Agents, & Companies in Colorado


Government Contacts

Since 2002, the state of Colorado is divided into 62 counties, with 270 municipal governments, cities, and towns, along with 1,411 special districts. There are also 182 public schools in the state.

The county commissioner, which is made up of three to five members (depending on the population), takes care of the administration and policymaking in each county. Each member is elected in a four-year term. There are also county clerks, assessors, treasurers, coroners, sheriffs, school superintendent, attorneys, and surveyors in each county.

Cities with structures defined by the state's constitution are called statutory cities. The governing power of the general assembly is either a mayor-council or council-manager form of government. More and more municipalities in the state opted for home rule, meaning they take control of local functions from the state government. Towns (those with a population of less than 2,000), are overseen by a mayor and a board of trustees. Denver, the state's largest city, is run by a mayor and a city council, plus a city auditor to check on the mayor. Both cities and town get their revenues from the property tax.

See the main Colorado Page for county links.

Adams

Alamosa

Arapahoe

Archuleta

Boulder

Broomfield

Chaffee

Clear Creek

Costilla

Delta

Denver

Douglas

Eagle

El Paso

Fremont

Garfield

Gilpin

Grand

Gunnison

Jefferson

La Plata

Larimer

Las Animas

Lincoln

Logan

Mesa

Moffat

Montezuma

Montrose

Morgan

Otero

Pitkin

Prowers

Pueblo

Rio Blanco

Rio Grande

Routt

Saguache

San Juan

San Miguel

Summit

Teller

Weld