Michigan Local Business, Insurance, and Government Resources

Navigate to:

Business Resources - Anything from getting a business license to finding funding

Local Insurance directory - Find local insurance brokers, agents, or companies

Government Contacts - Get in contact with each level of local government

Michigan Local Business Resources

The Michigan Business One Stop website is your complete source of information if you want to know about how to register your business. You can process the registration and obtain the permits and licenses through this website.

If you plan on hiring employees, you must secure a Federal Employer Identification Number (FEIN). This is a tax ID that will be assigned to your business and will be used for all financial transactions involving your business. The next step is to register your business name with the County Clerk.

After that, you must obtain the Unemployment Insurance Account (UIA) via the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs. This is a must before you hire employees for your business. It will be necessary when filing annual tax reports, too. You must also obtain a sales tax license - although some businesses are not required to get one. If it is required for your business, you can secure it via the Michigan Department of Treasury.

The final step is to secure all other necessary permits for your business to operate. The permit and license will vary depending on your business type. All of the application forms are available via the Michigan Business One Stop website.

Local Insurance Info, Agents, & Companies in Michigan


Government Contacts

As of 2002, Michigan State is divided into 83 counties, 533 municipalities, 1,242 townships, and a total of 2,804 separate units.

Each county in Michigan is governed by the county of the board of commissioners. Members of the board range from three to 35, depending on the population. They are elected for two-year terms. The executive power is vested in officers, namely the prosecuting attorney, the sheriff, treasurer clerk, and the register of deeds. These officials are elected for four-year terms. Some counties in Michigan vest the overall administrative power and responsibility in their administrator or county manager.

Most cities in Michigan adopted the 1909 home-rule legislation. This allowed them to establish their own form of government as an adopted charter. Some charters hold the mayor election. The mayor functions as the city's chief executive officer. Other cities however have a council-mayor system, where a council appoints the manager that serves as the chief executive officer. The mayor's office then becomes largely ceremonials. Many villages in the state are unified under the home-rule legislation so they can have police and fire protection.

The township government's authority is limited by the law of the state, which consists of four trustees (and more), a supervisor, clerk, and treasurer. These elected officials serve in a four-year term and together form the township board.

There are also 580 public school districts and 366 special districts in the state.

See the main Michigan Page for county links.

Alcona

Alger

Allegan

Alpena

Antrim

Arenac

Barry

Bay

Berrien

Branch

Calhoun

Cass

Charlevoix

Cheboygan

Chippewa

Clare

Clinton

Crawford

Delta

Dickinson

Eaton

Emmet

Genesee

Gladwin

Grand Traverse

Gratiot

Hillsdale

Houghton

Ingham

Ionia

Iosco

Iron

Isabella

Jackson

Kalamazoo

Kent

Keweenaw

Lapeer

Lenawee

Livingston

Macomb

Manistee

Marquette

Mason

Mecosta

Midland

Missaukee

Monroe

Montcalm

Muskegon

Newaygo

Oakland

Oceana

Ogemaw

Osceola

Ottawa

Presque Isle

Roscommon

Saginaw

Sanilac

Shiawassee

St Clair

St Joseph

Tuscola

Van Buren

Washtenaw

Wayne

Wexford