Ohio Local Business, Insurance, and Government Resources

Navigate to:

Business Resources - Anything from getting a business license to finding funding

Local Insurance directory - Find local insurance brokers, agents, or companies

Government Contacts - Get in contact with each level of local government

Ohio Local Business Resources

There are a few simple steps that you need to follow if you want to register your business in Ohio. The first step is to go to the Office of the Secretary of State to file your registration. You can also find the form online and you can submit it through the website. Make sure to provide the documents that will be required for your registration, if any.

The next step is to go to the local IRS office in Ohio to obtain a Federal Employer Identification Number (required for those with employees). You must then file your business tax registration via the Ohio Department of Taxation. This will enable you to file taxes that are applicable for your business, which will also vary according to your business type.

If you are getting employees for your business, make sure to report it to the Ohio New Hire Reporting Center. You may have additional requirements for insurance such as Workers Compensation Insurance, before you can operate. You can also check for additional requirements at the Ohio Department of Job & Family Services.

Obtain proper licenses and permits that are required of your business. You can find information about this via the Ohio Business Gateway at the state government's official website.

Local Insurance Info, Agents, & Companies in Ohio


Government Contacts

The local government of Ohio is divided into 88 counties, 942 cities and villages, and 1,308 towns. They also have more than 600 public school districts and over 600 special districts.

A board of commissioner is responsible for administering every county in Ohio. Each of these commissioners has a four-year term and their authority is governed by the state law. Meanwhile, the officials in a county government also have four-year terms. This applies to the auditor, clerk of courts, sheriff, treasurer, prosecuting attorney, coroner, engineer, and more.

A village with a population of at least 5,000 people can be recognized as a city. When this happens, that city must establish its own executive and legislative bodies.

A city government, on the other hand, must follow the mayor-council plan. There are two types of governments to choose from that is based on one of two methods: commission type or the city-manager form.

Cleveland was one of those cities to adopt the city-manager form from 1924 to 1932. Meanwhile, most other cities, including the capital city of Columbus, follows the mayor-council form of government.

See the main Ohio Page for county links.

Allen

Ashland

Ashtabula

Athens

Auglaize

Belmont

Butler

Carroll

Champaign

Clark

Clermont

Clinton

Columbiana

Coshocton

Crawford

Cuyahoga

Darke

Defiance

Delaware

Erie

Fairfield

Fayette

Franklin

Fulton

Gallia

Geauga

Greene

Guernsey

Hamilton

Hancock

Henry

Highland

Holmes

Huron

Jefferson

Knox

Lake

Lawrence

Licking

Logan

Lorain

Lucas

Madison

Mahoning

Marion

Medina

Meigs

Mercer

Miami

Montgomery

Morrow

Muskingum

Ottawa

Perry

Pike

Portage

Preble

Putnam

Richland

Ross

Sandusky

Scioto

Seneca

Shelby

Stark

Summit

Trumbull

Tuscarawas

Van Wert

Warren

Wayne

Wood