Oklahoma Local Business, Insurance, and Government Resources

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Business Resources - Anything from getting a business license to finding funding

Local Insurance directory - Find local insurance brokers, agents, or companies

Government Contacts - Get in contact with each level of local government

Oklahoma Local Business Resources

For aspiring business owners in Oklahoma, there are essential steps you need to take in order to get your business fully registered. As with most other states, you have to start by deciding on a business structure. This will have tax and legal implications for your business so make sure you consult a legal expert on the matter.

The type of business structure you choose will also determine the requirements you need to fulfill in order to register your business. Once that is completed, you can file registration for your business or trade name. This can be done via the Oklahoma Secretary of State or the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

The next step is to secure business licenses and permits. The sales tax permit can be obtained through the Oklahoma Tax Commission and any other permits can be obtained through the Department of Commerce. You can check the required licenses through the department's Business Customer Services.

You will also need to file for a Federal Employment Identification Number, even if you don't have employees. This should be filed through the Internal Revenue Service office or website. Additional tax and insurance requirements are a must for certain types of businesses, especially if you have employees.

Local Insurance Info, Agents, & Companies in Oklahoma


Government Contacts

The state of Oklahoma is made up of 77 counties, 590 cities and towns, and hundred more incorporated areas. In addition to this, the state is divided into 571 public school districts and 560 special districts.

The county government in Oklahoma is made up of three commissioners that are elected per district. In addition to this, the local government also has its own county clerk, treasurer, assessor, sheriff, surveyor, and a school superintendent. Towns that have more than 1,000 residents are incorporated as cities.

Meanwhile, cities with over 2,000 residents can be recognized as home-rule city. They are able to choose their own government by adopting the home-rule charter. Cities, on the other hand, can adopt either the mayor-council or council-manager systems. Majority of the cities in Oklahoma have adopted the council-manager form of governance.

The county government provides the basic services to its residents such as public roads and safety. In exchange, they collect taxes and get funding from the state government.

See the main Oklahoma Page for county links.

Bryan

Caddo

Canadian

Carter

Cherokee

Cleveland

Comanche

Creek

Custer

Garfield

Grady

Harper

Jackson

Kay

Logan

Major

Mayes

Murray

Muskogee

Oklahoma

Ottawa

Payne

Pittsburg

Pontotoc

Pottawatomie

Pushmataha

Rogers

Sequoyah

Stephens

Texas

Tulsa

Wagoner

Washington

Woods

Woodward