South Carolina Local Business Resources

To start your business in South Carolina, you must follow the basic business registration process. The first thing you need to decide on is the type of business structure. The type of structure that you plan to register will also determine the requirements you need to fulfill upon filing your application. Moreover, you must take the legal and tax implications of your chosen business entity.

You must also register a business name through the Secretary of State Office or website. Upon registration, the name will be reserved for 120 days to give you adequate time to complete the registration process.

Once you have registered the business name, you can obtain the licenses and permits required within your city or county. There are different licenses and permits required based on the type of business you plan to open, too. You can check these licenses and permits requirements at the Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation or the Division of Professional and Occupational Licensing.

The next step is the business tax registration. You must fulfill different forms for this depending on your business structure. Additional insurance requirements might also be needed for certain types of businesses. It will be determined according to your industry and if you have employees, or not.

Local Insurance Info, Agents, & Companies in South Carolina


Government Contacts

The state of South Carolina and its local government is divided into two: general-purpose and special-purpose. The general-purpose category comprises the counties and municipalities. The state has a total of 46 counties and 269 municipalities.

On the other hand, the special-purpose governments are the school and special districts. There are 85 public school districts and 301 special districts in South Carolina. There are also 10 regional councils that offer technical and advisory services to both types of governments.

The political subdivisions in the state are identified within the municipalities and counties. It is the constitution that distinguishes the type of government structure that is observed within the counties and municipalities. In South Carolina, this can be either one of four: council, council-supervisor, mayor-council, and council-manager.

As of the 1975 legislation, all counties and municipalities in South Carolina share the same powers, no matter the size of each county or municipality. The general-purpose local government is responsible for providing services that directly impact the lives of the citizens.

See the main South Carolina Page for county links.

Aiken

Anderson

Bamberg

Beaufort

Berkeley

Charleston

Chester

Chesterfield

Colleton

Darlington

Dorchester

Florence

Greenville

Greenwood

Hampton

Horry

Laurens

Lexington

Marion

Marlboro

Newberry

Oconee

Orangeburg

Pickens

Richland

Spartanburg

Sumter

York